Emory Wheel: Media and Super PACs Dominate Our Political Discourse

Written by admin on March 28th, 2012

In our time, the best advice to give someone looking to make a difference in the nation’s political discourse would be to not seek elected office and stay out of politics. With the advent of Super PACs and a 24-hour news cycle, pundits and political agencies have more influence than Congress itself.

Emory Wheel

In the words of comedian Robin Williams: “Politicians should wear uniforms like NASCAR drivers so we can identify their corporate sponsors.”

Gallup.com has consistently rated congressional approval around 12 percent for the past several months and for good reason — it doesn’t get anything done. Last summer’s debt ceiling debate, stalling the American Jobs Act and preventing members of Congress from participating in insider trading are only a few examples of the impotence of the legislative branch.

Even in the 111th Congress, which passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), required 60 votes in the Senate to even debate the passage of a bill.
This is certainly not a recent development, but what has become increasingly relevant are the rise of political organizations that lack transparency, as they are fueled by anonymous donors, as a result of the disastrous Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision.

Although Super PACs are prohibited by law from aligning with a particular candidate, it is no secret that there is a definite connection between candidates and the innocuous-sounding money machines that put our nation’s interests in the hands of the wealthy few.

Winning Our Future supports the imminent bust of Newt Gingrich’s candidacy, Restore Our Future is the Super PAC funding Mitt Romney’s future “restoration” of his ever-changing political opinions, the Red White and Blue Fund pulls in the green for Santorum and Revolution PAC appears to back Ron Paul’s ash heap candidacy.

The irony of Super PACs in the Republican primaries is that with as much money and power they control, they prop up a band of misfits who are clearly unable, with the potential exception of Romney, to make the White House their next place of residence. If the Republican National Convention is split in Tampa this August, it will likely be because of the many nameless individuals controlling Super PACs.

Following the theme of centralized power and individuals pulling the political strings from behind the curtain are people like Grover Norquist who is unfamiliar to most Americans despite being called, by many, the most powerful man in Washington. His often-overlooked role is his so-called Taxpayer Protection Pledge, which binds 238 Representatives and 41 Senators, and in effect, the rest of Congress from ever raising taxes despite support from the majority of Americans to do so. The punishment for breaking the pledge is conservative uproar, but the consequence for following through with it is fiscal irresponsibility and denying the reality that taxes occasionally need to be raised.

The problem exists not only for conservative causes, but also with people like George Soros funding liberal organizations and several democratic congressmen across the nation. Organizations like the Human Rights Campaign that fights for gay rights, though a noble cause, have gained considerable influence in recent years.

And if controlling the money in elections isn’t enough, the media is also drastically more powerful than Congress. Although they use completely different tactics, Fox News and people like Jon Stewart or Stephen Colbert do more to shape public opinion than just about anyone in the country, and their viewers have more trust in them than their elected officials.

Fox News, in particular, has done a fantastic job to blur the line between quasi-pundits and quasi-politicians with Sarah Palin, Mike Huckabee and Karl Rove as contributors. This is particularly troubling considering that the rule of thumb for these talking heads is to make the most outlandish statements in order to have better ratings.

If the argument that individuals who do not hold public office have more power than those on Capitol Hill is not clear enough, consider the last time any lawmaker received more attention for legislating than did Rush Limbaugh’s recent comments about Georgetown Law student Sandra Fluke or the last time a lawmaker received more attention for legislative efforts than for controversy.

In the current political system, money and the media have managed to tilt power in favor of the few and the result is a Washington that works for special interests, rather than special interests working for Washington, let alone Washington working for its constituents.

 

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